New Contribution Limits Set for 2015-2016 Cycle

Home » Resources » Downloads & Guides » New Contribution Limits Set for 2015-2016 Cycle

New Contribution Limits Set for 2015-2016 Cycle

Posted on

The 2015-2016 election cycle will see many changes to campaign finance laws and limits.

Earlier this week, the Federal Election Commission released new spending limits for the 2015-2016 cycle to adjust for inflation. Individuals can now donate up to $2,700 per candidate per election and up to $33,400 to party committees for political advocacy.

But this is only the most recent change to effect campaign spending limits & FEC regulations.

Last spring, the Supreme Court struck down the cap that limited individuals to donating no more than $123,200 to all federal candidates and political committees per cycle. In McCutcheon v. FEC, the court ruled 5-4 to end the $123,200 limit on the basis that it infringed on First Amendment rights.

In December, Congress also created three new types of political funds for national party committees in the omnibus bill. Donors may now contribute up to $100,200 per year to each of the funds including:

  • A party convention fund for the Republican National Committee and Democratic National Committee that may accept up to $100,200 per year from an individual and up to $45,000 per year from a multicandidate PAC.
  • A building fund that may accept up to $100,200 per year from an individual and up to $45,000 per year from a multicandidate PAC. In addition to the RNC, both the NRCC and NRSC are eligible to create these.
  • A recount & legal proceedings fund that may accept up to $100,200 per year from an individual and up to $45,000 per year from a multicandidate PAC. The NRCC and NRSC are also eligible for these types of funds.

2015-2016 FEC Limits

The creation of these funds grew out of the need for both the RNC and DNC to raise support for their party conventions after a 2014 law ended public funding of those events. The Gabriella Miller Kids First Research Act directed the $126 million that was allocated for national party conventions over the next decade to the National Institutes of Health for research on pediatric diseases.